[Adjectives] – Lesson 1: What are adjectives?

Adjectives
We use an adjective to describe the qualities of people, things, places, etc. Can you see the young woman at the end of the street?
He’s a great singer.
We use an adjective (not an adverb) after ‘linking’ verbs such as be, become, feel, seem, smell, sound, look, etc. It looks interesting.
It tastes delicious.
His ideas are interesting.
We can use an adjective to describe the object of a sentence. His answer made his boss angry.

 

Adjectives – common mistakes
Common mistakes Correct version Why?
She was too frighten to say a word. She was too frightened to say a word. Many adjectives are participle forms of verbs.
The -ed form describes how someone feels (bored).
The -ing form describes the person or thing that causes the feeling (boring).
I am very interesting in this problem. I am very interested in this problem.
It was a bored film. It was a boring film.
The camera works perfect. The camera works perfectly. We use adverbs to say how we do something.
She married a German, young, tall lawyer. She married a tall, young, German lawyer. Adjectives normally go in the following sequence: size-age-shape-colour-origin-material-purpose.

 

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[Adjectives] – Lesson 2: Comparative and superlative of adjectives

Comparative and superlative adjectives: basic rules
Type of adjective Adjective Comparative Superlative
Short adjectives (one-syllable adjectives) old
long
older
longer
the oldest
the longest
Adjectives ending with one vowel and one consonant big
hot
bigger
hotter
the biggest
the hottest
Two-syllable adjectives ending in -y ugly
noisy
messy
uglier
noisier 
messier
the ugliest
the noisiest 
the messiest
Longer adjectives (adjectives with two or more syllables) careful
expensive
beautiful
more careful
more expensive
more beautiful
the most careful
the most expensive
the most beautiful
With some two-syllable adjectives both -er/-est endings and more/most are possible. polite
common
more polite/politer
more common/commoner
the most polite/the politest
the most common/the commonest
With some two-syllable adjectives only an -er/-est ending is possible. narrow
simple
clever
narrower
simpler
cleverer
the narrowest
the simplest
the cleverest

 

Notable exceptions
good better the best
bad worse the worst
far further / farther the furthest / the farthest